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How to obtain Gran Turismo 7’s Three Legendary Cars Trophy 

How to obtain Gran Turismo 7’s Three Legendary Cars Trophy

Here are the three legendary cars you need to buy to unlock the Trophy, and how you can find them.

“Acquire three legendary race cars that were once destined to win 24-hour races”.  

On the face of it, this seems like a simple enough ‘collect three cars and get a Trophy’ assignment. However, the cars in question must first be identified and then purchased.

Again, that doesn’t sound like such a big deal until you realise the cars in question must come from the Legend Cars pavilion and can cost upwards of 12,000,000 credits. Ouch. 

Gran Turismo 7’s Three Legendary Cars Trophy

The three cars 

The three cars you need to purchase to obtain the Trophy are as follows: 

  • Ford Mark IV Race Car ’67 – 4,600,000 credits – Available on 8th-11th March 2022 
  • Jaguar XJ13 ‘66 – 12,000,000 credits – Available between 13th-15th March 2022 
  • Ferrari 330 P4 ‘67 – 9,000,000 credits – Available from 19th April 2022 

We’ve also put here the prices when they first appeared in the Legends Cars dealership and the dates they appeared.

How to obtain Gran Turismo 7’s Three Legendary Cars Trophy - Ford Mark IV Race Car ’67
Three Legendary Cars Trophy – Ford Mark IV Race Car ’67

Interestingly, this is exactly the same as Gran Turismo 5’s Dream Race Trophy from 2010. 

How to obtain Gran Turismo 7’s Three Legendary Cars Trophy - Jaguar XJ13 ‘66
Three Legendary Cars Trophy – Jaguar XJ13 ‘66

Total funds required: 25,600,000 credits 

Three Legendary Cars Trophy - Ferrari 330 P4 ‘67
Three Legendary Cars Trophy – Ferrari 330 P4 ‘67

What makes this Trophy so difficult? 

The challenge here isn’t really acquiring the 25.6million credits needed to buy the three cars – although that is a big task in itself – but working with the Legends Cars dealership. 

The vehicles are not available there all of the time. The pavilion includes only 10 cars at once, and the stock slowly rotates, with a slight change each day. After a few days, each car sells out too.

How to obtain Gran Turismo 7’s Three Legendary Cars Trophy - Ford Mark IV Race Car ’67, sold out

So, you must first save up and then check the game each day to see if the stocklist has been updated with one of the specific vehicles. 

That means the first day public players of Gran Turismo 7 were able to pick up this Trophy was today (19th April 2022), provided of course they had the foresight to purchase the Ford and the Jaguar on the run-up. 

Credit tips 

We’ve previously written about how to obtain credits quickly in Gran Turismo 7 and created a video. But, since then, things have changed dramatically. 

A March 2022 update provided players with 1million free credits, winner. Then the 1.11 update implemented bonus pay-outs for achieving all-bronze and all-gold for Circuit Experience challenges. There have also been more World Circuits events added, plus a suite of new one-hour races in the Missions area, all of which pay handsomely. 

Our advice is simple – play and enjoy the game, rack up the credits and save them until one of these three cars appears. 

Why these three cars? 

Why these three cars and why is there such an emphasis on them in Gran Turismo games? 

Well, one factor is that the series focuses primarily on cars that are steeped in history and fundamental in forming the roots of car culture. 

Sure, it has newer models within it, but you can take your chintzy Koenigseggs and leave them at the door. 

Another is that these three cars have fascinating backgrounds. 

Jaguar XJ13 ‘66 – 704.53 PP – 12,000,000 Credits 

The Jaguar XJ13 was a vehicle designed to race at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the Prototype class. However, it didn’t make it to the legendary French enduro thanks to some bad timing. Firstly, Jaguar was in the process of merging with British Motor Corporation, (BMC) and due to this distraction testing didn’t get underway until early 1967. 

Secondly, and most conclusively, Ford’s Mk II GT40 dominantly won the 1966 edition of the race in such a fashion that the XJ13 was deemed obsolete before it even took to the track.  

Jaguar XJ13, 2007 Goodwood Media Day, Jeff Bloxham LAT Photographic, Motorsport Images
Jaguar XJ13, 2007 Goodwood Media Day, Jeff Bloxham LAT Photographic – Motorsport Images

The race’s rules were then changed for 1968 to restrict Prototype engine sizes to 3.0-litres – a slight issue for the Jag’s 5.0-litre V12 unit. On the bright side, its bespoke racing engine formed the basis for many of Jaguar’s silky smooth road car motors for years to come. 

Only one example of the XJ13 was ever built – various replicas notwithstanding – and is still owned privately nowadays, despite a significant crash while filming promotional material for the launch of the V12-powered Jaguar E-Type in 1971. 

The cost? The XJ13 has never been valued, but twelve million in-game credits seems quite conservative considering the car’s history and rarity. 

Ford Mark IV Race Car ’67 – 708.53 PP – 4,600,000 Credits 

The Ford GT40 was originally built in the UK and was based on Eric Broadley’s acclaimed 1964 Lola Mk6 GT. Although subsequent Ford GT40s were heavily revised from Lola’s template, they retained its iconic deep-cut door line. 

The Mk II Ford GT40 was famous for breaking Ferrari’s stranglehold on the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966, becoming a Hollywood film starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon in 2019. The actors played test driver Ken Miles and legendary designer/driver Carrol Shelby respectively, and both would have a massive impact on Ford’s future success (Miles and Shelby, not Bale and Damon). 

Ford Mark IV, Dan Gurney and A.J. Foyt, Shelby-American, Ford GT40 Mk.IV, on the grid - Motorsport Images
Ford Mark IV, Dan Gurney and A.J. Foyt, Shelby-American, Ford GT40 Mk.IV, on the grid – Motorsport Images

The subsequent Mk III was built as a road car only, so the Mk IV arrived as a true successor to the Mk II in 1967, and it looked like a completely different car altogether – it featured a longer, more aerodynamic body better suited to Le Mans’ long Mulsanne straight. 

The number one car, driven by legendary American racing drivers Dan Gurney and A.J. Foyt, took the win with a four-lap lead over the Ferrari 330 P4 of Mike Parkes and Ludovico Scarfiotti, cementing its position as a historic racing car.  

Speaking of Ferrari… 

Ferrari 330 P4 ‘67 – 732.33 PP – 9,000,000 credits 

The car beaten into second place in the 1967 24-Hours of Le Mans was destined to win another 24-hour race that season, but it was Daytona in Florida, not Le Mans. 

After being decimated by Ford’s Mk II in 1966, the Prancing Horse regrouped at Maranello and built the 330 P4 for the 1967 season. It got off to a successful start, galloping to a one-two-three result at the Daytona 24 Hours in February of that year. 

By 10th-11th June however, the 450bhp V12 Ferrari had been comprehensively defeated by the Ford Mark IV. It was to be the last hurrah of the large capacity Group 6 Prototypes, thanks to the incredible speeds shown – the winners’ average speed being over 135mph.  

Ferrari 330 P4, Ludocivo Scarfiotti (ITA) with Mike Parkes (GBR) Ferrari 330 P4 Coupe, 24 Hours of Le Mans, 11th June 1967, Photographer David Phipps - Motorsport Images
Ferrari 330 P4, Ludocivo Scarfiotti (ITA) with Mike Parkes (GBR) Ferrari 330 P4 Coupe, 24 Hours of Le Mans, 11th June 1967, Photographer David Phipps – Motorsport Images

Nervous about the rising speeds, and the 1955 Le Mans tragedy still fresh in the memory, the organisers switched the Group 6 Prototypes’ engine capacity to a maximum of 3 litres, effectively banning the 7.0l Ford and 4.0l Ferrari.  

If you wanted to buy a Ferrari 330 P4 today, there’s literally only one option, since only one exists! There are replicas around, but it’s thought the real deal will set you back countless millions.  

If you had the requisite millions, you’d still need to ask the owner nicely if you could buy it off him. Although I’m sure Lawrence Stroll quite enjoys having it… 

Image source: Motorsport Images

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